THE BERKSHIRE EDGE ON-AIR – WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 9, 2022


Guided by respected journalistic standards, the principle of fairness, the quest for truth, a commitment to social, economic and environmental justice, and an abiding admiration for the independent spirit of the Berkshires, The Berkshire Edge offers in-depth local news reports and features, perspectives on the arts, wide-ranging commentary, and a comprehensive calendar of events – all written, illustrated, and, in some cases performed, with wit, intelligence, insight and humor.

Here are a few stories from the Edge this week:

1. We have a huge fight going on in West Stockbridge between a performing arts venue called The Foundry and a restaurant called Truc’s Oriental Express.  https://theberkshireedge.com/trucs-vs-foundry-soap-opera-continues-at-contentious-public-hearing/

2. There’s an informal group in Housatonic fighting the Housatonic Water Works.  It’s called the Housatonic Clean Water Alliance.  This week a member of the alliance hired an attorney from Boston, upping the ante in this fight.

3.We had two interesting stories this week as part of our Business Monday line-up: 

One was the announcement that a store on Railroad Street in Great Barrington is closing after 43 years.  And the owner has born witness to the changes in the town. https://theberkshireedge.com/business-monday-byzantium-set-to-close-in-january/

The second comes from our “Personal shopper” Harriet Ziefert who admits to being a scarf-aholic and talks about the scarves she has found at Karen Allen Fiber Arts on Railroad Street in Great Barrington. https://theberkshireedge.com/personal-shopper-finding-scarves-at-karen-allen-fiber-arts/

4. Our weather guru Nick Diller puts the recent warm weather into historical perspective.

5. We have the second in an ongoing series by Sheela Clary called “Where We Are”, in which she talks to local community people who live and work in the Berkshires about how they feel about their lives here.  This installment focuses on three local voices ranging in age from eighteen to forty-one. They were all born and raised in South County.

The first installment was published on October 30, and includes conversations with six local people onhow they are doing, what troubles them, and what gives them hope. 



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